20 Replies Latest reply: Feb 7, 2012 9:19 AM by keithwhitehead RSS

    How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet

    justinabshire

      I am having a problem with viewing my slingbox on a Linksys WRT543G-AT Router using a Sierra Wireless 881 aircard.

        • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
          eferz Expert

          Seems like the Sierra Wireless 881 aircard is High Speed Packet Access (HSPA) card.  Which is just a way to access the internet over the cellular netowrk.  In order figure out where the problem originates, we should make sure your Slingbox can be accessed outside of your local network.

           

          Once you have the local viewing  setup for your Slingbox your done  with its configuration.  The only  thing that's preventing you from  remote viewing is your router.

           

          Slingbox  provides its support through port 5001 (by   default) and that's how you  access it from your private network and    public network.  However,  your router has certain services to provide    you with a safe  networking enviroment.  Unfortunately, these services    are also  preventing you from accessing your Slingbox remotely. One way    to  allow your Slingbox outside of your network is port forwarding.      Without port forwarding any internet request for port 5001 will be     ignored.  This is because your router doesn't know which of your   networked clients will handle it.

           

          When you configure  port forwarding on your  router,  you specify port 5001.  This is the  port  which the Slingbox  provides  its services.  So, the next important  part  of completing the  port  forwarding rule is the IP address of your  Slingbox.  Once  you've  completed setting up the port forwarding rule,  all of the  outside requests for port 5001 to be directed to your  Slingbox.

           

          Another  alternative is Universal Plug  and  Play (uPnP)  its a set of protocols  that allows to devices to   communicate with one  another for  configuration purposes.  If your  router is uPnP compatible, it is  possible that its services is disabled  by  default.

           

          To  test your router's  configuration, go to http://www.canyouseeme.org and  in  the "What Port?" box type in the port number that your slingbox  is   using and click the "Check" button.

           

          If you set it  up correctly, then  you'll get a response  "Success: I can see your service on  <public   IP address> on port (<port number>)".

            • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
              justinabshire

              I just attempted everything you suggested I am able to view the slingbox on the local network.  I did setup the port forwarding for the slingbox using 5001 and the ip address.  Now when I attempt to setup internet viewing it keeps saying "Internet Viewing setup was unsuccessful."   I also used the website and it said it was unable to see my service on port 5001.

                • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                  eferz Expert

                  Okay, at least we know the hold up is in the router.  We know that because you can view it locally, and that website isn't able to get past your router.

                   

                  We need to verify that you're using the right information for your port forwarding rule.  Using the stand alone Slingplayer, go to the command bar | Help | About Slingbox  <model> (Alt + E) | Information Tab.  There in the "Lan" subsection, you'll see the "IP Address" and "Port" information.  That is the information that you need to setup Port Forwarding.  Please verify that information matches the Port Fowarding rule in your router.

                    • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                      justinabshire

                      Yes everything in the LAN information matches everything for the Port Forwarding.  Do you feel that maybe At&t is blocking this.

                        • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                          eferz Expert

                          I doubt it, because the test you're preforming from http://www.canyouseeme.org is sent from their servers's IPS to your router.  The test is to check if it can bypass your firewall.  Just make sure you're connecting to the website using a computer within the same local network as the Slingbox.  Otherwise, if you try to do that over the HSPA card then it is testing's ports on your laptop over cellular and not your Slingbox through your home firewall.

                           

                          I took a look at the your router's configuration on http://portforward.com which talk about some additional steps of disabling "Block Anonymous Internet Requests".  Here's the link to the full article, http://portforward.com/english/routers/port_forwarding/Linksys/WRT54G3G/SlingBox.htm   Perhaps this will help you open your router up enough to allow the traffic to your Slingbox.

                            • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                              justinabshire

                              I disabled the Firewall to see if that would work and it seems to be having the same problems.  Also, I tried the canyouseeme.org again and still says the same thing.

                                • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                                  eferz Expert

                                  That's not going to help you out.

                                   

                                  Let me explain why.

                                   

                                  Typical Residential ISPs will assign their customers a single public IP address.  Your router will use Network Address Translation (NAT) to facilitate many devices through that IP address.  This is done by creating a private network.  Within this private network is a range of IP address which have been set aside for purposes of allowing any organization to create its own private network space.  Traffic from the internet will not be able to direct requests to these address because they exist in a private space.  Instead we need to use mechanisms like Port Forwarding in order to redirect specific public traffic into the private network space.

                                   

                                  So, by "turning off" your firewall all your doing is reducing the security mesures in place for your network.  This does not address the need to allow the traffic into your network and to direct it to the proper device.

                                   

                                  Again,  I  took a look at the your router's configuration on http://portforward.com which talk about some additional steps of disabling "Block Anonymous  Internet Requests".  Here's the link to the full article, http://portforward.com/english/routers/port_forwarding/Linksys/WRT54G3G/SlingBox.htm    Perhaps this will help you open your router up enough to allow the  traffic to your Slingbox.

                                   

                                  Also make sure that you're using "Port Range Forwading" at least that's how its described from the above article.  I noticed Port Triggering was an option but that's a little different and is not going to help with what we need to accomplish.

                                    • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                                      justinabshire

                                      Ok I just went through the entire setup process how that website instructs.  It seems to still not allow me to see the slingbox on the outside of the router.  Do you think the Internet Connection Type may have something to do with it the connection is set at PPPoE.  Thanks

                                        • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                                          eferz Expert

                                          You bring up an interesting point.  Actually, a couple of them which I haven't thought about.

                                           

                                          First concern is Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE).  One of the problems with PPPoE is that it will disconnect and release its address after a period of inactivity.  So, to prevent that you might have to run a keep alive program running on a PC.  However, our tests with http://www.canyouseeme.org would have ensured that the PPPoE connection was active.  But, this can be a concern later when your out and about.

                                           

                                          Another thing I haven't thought of in a while, is that some broadband modems might have their own route/firewall built-in.  One symptom of this your router's using a Private IP address.  Take a look at the address below.  If you see that your router's WAN IP address has an IP address that falls within one of the ranges below then your broadband modem is employing Network Address Translation (NAT).  This is a good sign that the modem is employing other gateway/firewall services.

                                           

                                          Private IP addresses:

                                          • 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
                                          • 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
                                          • 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255

                                           

                                          If that is the case, then you'll also need to figure out to work around the broadband modem's security mechanisms.

                          • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                            eferz Expert

                            This is how I imagine how your network looks like...

                             

                            sling-setup-small.jpg

                            • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                              Bryanod Novice

                              Great info

                               

                              change the port to 8080

                                • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                                  justinabshire

                                  Where do I go in the router to change the port to 8080. Also, the two IP's changed numbers but both of them match each other.

                                    • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                                      eferz Expert

                                      Oh, wow.  My apologies for that.  I didn't realize that you were using the aircard in the router.

                                       

                                      Anyways, he's referring to changing the Slingbox port from 5001 to 8080 and then altering the port forwarding rules to match it.

                                       

                                      And, it could be your mobile ISP blocking your services since most mobile providers don't like have any time of server hosted on the Cellular Network.

                                        • Re: How to setup a WRT54G3G-AT with an aircard and view on the internet
                                          eferz Expert

                                          http://www.wireless.att.com/cell-phone-service/legal/plan-terms.jsp

                                           

                                          Excerpt of AT&T Terms of Services:


                                          "Prohibited and Permissible Uses: Except as may otherwise be specifically permitted or prohibited for select data plans, data sessions may be conducted only for the following purposes: (i) Internet browsing; (ii) email; and (iii) intranet access (including access to corporate intranets, email, and individual productivity applications like customer relationship management, sales force, and field service automation). While most common uses for Intranet browsing, email and intranet access are permitted by your data plan, there are certain uses that cause extreme network capacity issues and interference with the network and are therefore prohibited. Examples of prohibited uses include, without limitation, the following: (i) server devices or host computer applications, including, but not limited to, Web camera posts or broadcasts, automatic data feeds, automated machine-to-machine connections or peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing; (ii) as a substitute or backup for private lines, landlines or full-time or dedicated data connections; (iii) "auto-responders," "cancel-bots," or similar automated or manual routines which generate excessive amounts of net traffic, or which disrupt net user groups or email use by others; (iv) "spam" or unsolicited commercial or bulk email (or activities that have the effect of facilitating unsolicited commercial email or unsolicited bulk email); (v) any activity that adversely affects the ability of other people or systems to use either AT&T's wireless services or other parties' Internet-based resources, including "denial of service" (DoS) attacks against another network host or individual user; (vi) accessing, or attempting to access without authority, the accounts of others, or to penetrate, or attempt to penetrate, security measures of AT&T's wireless network or another entity's network or systems; (vii) software or other devices that maintain continuous active Internet connections when a computer's connection would otherwise be idle or any "keep alive" functions, unless they adhere to AT&T's data retry requirements, which may be changed from time to time. This means, by way of example only, that checking email, surfing the Internet, downloading legally acquired songs, and/or visiting corporate intranets is permitted, but downloading movies using P2P file sharing services, redirecting television signals for viewing on Personal Computers, web broadcasting, and/or for the operation of servers, telemetry devices and/or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition devices is prohibited. Furthermore, plans (unless specifically designated for tethering usage) cannot be used for any applications that tether the device (through use of, including without limitation, connection kits, other phone/smartphone to computer accessories, BLUETOOTH® or any other wireless technology) to Personal Computers (including without limitation, laptops), or other equipment for any purpose. Accordingly, AT&T reserves the right to (i) deny, disconnect, modify and/or terminate Service, without notice, to anyone it believes is using the Service in any manner prohibited or whose usage adversely impacts its wireless network or service levels or hinders access to its wireless network, including without limitation, after a significant period of inactivity or after sessions of excessive usage and (ii) otherwise protect its wireless network from harm, compromised capacity or degradation in performance, which may impact legitimate data flows. You may not send solicitations to AT&T's wireless subscribers without their consent. You may not use the Services other than as intended by AT&T and applicable law. Plans are for individual, non-commercial use only and are not for resale. AT&T may, but is not required to, monitor your compliance, or the compliance of other subscribers, with AT&T's terms, conditions, or policies."