2 Replies Latest reply: Apr 19, 2012 2:42 PM by PatnetPatnet RSS

    Speed -- What happens between continents

    PatnetPatnet Newbie

      Hi, can anyone explain this:

       

      My upstream at the Slingbox Pro HD in Europe is 2.76 Megabits. My downstream at the laptop viewing in North America is 10.1 Megabits. The Sling stream is 296 kbps. Why is that? Why isn't the Sling streaming somewhere around 2.76 rather than just 10% of that. To add insult to injury I often get around 2400 kbps (2 1/4 Megabits) but often don't. Why isn't it consistent? The equipment is the same, the ISP is paid--and this has been going on for years across multiple Slingboxes and multiple ISPs. Why can't I get any answer, and why can't I monitor the route between EU and NA?

        • Re: Speed -- What happens between continents
          callanish Apprentice

          Latency is a huge factor on a tcp stream where distance is involved that can restrict your speed but under 300kbps is just plain awful. Just for comparison, I'm also streaming from Europe to the U.S...about 5000 miles. 5mb upload stream to a 20mb stream in the U.S. My max speed is 1.3mbs on p.c, slingcatcher and iPad. When I was originally on a 1.5mb connection, I was getting around 768kbps to the U.S. If I remotely connect to my router, turn off port forwarding changing the TCP stream to a UDP SNATT stream, I was hitting 2mb's easy on my P.C. Would love to leave the port forwarding off, but I need it for the slingcatcher. The point is a TCP stream is extremely vulnerable and I've came to the conclusion that my video stream bottlenecks the minute it hits the East coast then the speeds just go south as the stream networks it's way to the West coast. Saw someone on the forum was getting a 3mb stream from a 10mb upload speed to florida from the U.K which isn't bad, but like you I am disappointed that I don't get a faster connection speed. The difference between you and I is that my speeds are consistent, whereas yours are all over the map.

           

          It's not really an answer to your question, it just addresses a reason for why we can lose a lot of speed when greater distances are involved.

            • Re: Speed -- What happens between continents
              PatnetPatnet Newbie

              I can see when I run a tracert that I have one hop between my West coast city and the UK. I'm not really learning where the bottleneck is. When I'[ve reported my tracert findings to the US ISP they start on about my local network--completely ignoring my requests that they investigate their own network. Same with the UK ISP--they just say outside the UK is not their responsibility.

               

              Does anyone know of any tools that can be used to investigate further?