7 Replies Latest reply: Mar 22, 2012 8:22 PM by chakkarinen RSS

    Connecting locally when you're on your own network

    KenV54

      After multiple phone calls with tech support, in which I was told it couldn't really be done with my iMac, or if I used a Legacy SlingPlayer i wouldn't get hi-def (true), I figured out the solution.

       

      All you do (on my Comcast modem-router, at least) is to go into configuration, go to advanced, the "port forwarding" then enter the private IP address for the Slingbox Pro HDand the port number, both of which are available from the Slingbox website. Then you can access the Slingbox Pro HD locally and not just on the Internet.

       

      I wasn't even able to "see" the Slingbox for setup initially with the Mac on my  own network, regardless of disabling firewalls, etc. I had to boot into  my Parallels Windows XP VM(virtual machine) and get to the Slingbox via  Windows, update the firmware, etc. Then, at least

       

      I don't actually know if the "port forwarding" is part of the modem config or the router config, since I have a combined modem-router, but I do know that it works for me.

       

      Hope this helps someone who can't set up the SB on a Mac or who can't run Slingbox locally either with Mac or Windows.

        • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
          chakkarinen Apprentice

          Port forwarding is a function performed by the router, not the modem.   And if you have your Mac and your SB on the same local area network, then the modem is not involved at all.   In fact, you should be able to see the SB on the local area network from any other computer on that same local area network, even if the modem is not  connecting to your ISP, since the local network assignments are handled exclusively by the router.

            • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
              KenV54

              Thanks very much, chakkarinen. Very helpful.

               

              I don't understand why the SB support people don't use this to solve the apparently common problem of being unable to connect when on your own network. Istead they had me DL a legacy Slingplayer for my Mac which worked but didn't have high def. Now I can watch at home with high def.

               

              The support people don't seem to want to take responsibility for having people make changes in their router configurations. I suppose they're afraid they'll mess things up with their networks in general and then blame SB. But it could be an option with the end user being warned that anything that happens is not SB's responsibility.

                • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
                  chakkarinen Apprentice

                  Besides the reasons you mention, it may not be easy to explain to individuals how to modify their routers to optimize the SB connections, since there are so many different manufacturers and models of routers, and the  procedures for re-programming the routers to do various things can and do vary so much between the different router models.

                   

                  When you compound the issue with all of the concerns about maintaining security of your home network (for example, while the WPA encryption for your wireless router is quite strong -- and you definitely do not want to use WEP encryption, as it can be hacked in less than a minute -- the WPS ("WPA Setup") is not secure, so if you should use WPS to configure any devices to your wireless router, you should immediately thereafter disable the WPS routine in your router, so that nefarious folks can not use its weaknesses to hack into your router).

                    • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
                      KenV54

                      "...the WPS ("WPA Setup") is not secure, so if you should use WPS to  configure any devices to your wireless router, you should immediately  thereafter disable the WPS routine in your router, so that nefarious  folks can not use its weaknesses to hack into your router)."

                       

                      I'm afraid I couldn't understand that last part. I do use WPA encryption, but don't know if I used WPS to set up the SBor port forwarding, or how to now disable the WPS setup if I did.

                        • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
                          chakkarinen Apprentice

                          The WPS routine is installed on most new routers (and is turned on by default on many of those new models) to make it eas(ier) to connect wireless devices (such as the new breed of wireless printers) to your router -- this comes in especially handy when you don't have a keyboard on the new device (like these printers) in which to enter any commands.  However, the "PIN" supplied with the WPS routine is often quite easy to hack (even though the WPA password itself can be quite difficult to hack via "brute force" methods, and once the bad guys have the WPS pin, they can pretty easily determine your WPA password as well.  So many network security experts ( I am not one of those, but my oldest son is) recommend disabling WPS as soon as you get your devices that are using it set up and working OK.

                           

                          If you log in to your router from a web browser window, there should be a screen in the router's wireless menu where you can disable  WPS by clicking or unclicking some radio button.  Best to leave it disabled, and only re-enable it when you need to install some new wireless device by means of WPS, then disable it again after the new device is connected.

                            • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
                              KenV54

                              Aha! Now I think understand. I navigated through my router settings, got to the WPS page, found that WPS had been enabled, and I disabled it.

                               

                              All it seems to mean is that a new wireless device cannot easily detect and connect to the router by pushing the router button--a sort of automatic discovery proess--rather than by locating the wi-fi network and my entering the correct WPA password. I had never used the WPS, anyway, and have connected my printer, blu-ray player, etc. manually.

                               

                              Thanks for your clear explanation.

                                • Re: Connecting locally when you're on your own network
                                  chakkarinen Apprentice

                                  Exactly.   And you can see why the WPS is handy.  But unfortunately, most of the router software packages, as delivered, do not limit the number of times one can attempt to guess the WPS pin, and with a simple programming of keystrokes, a nepherious person could automate the attempts to guess that WPS pin, and would succeed within a few minutes.   There are other software (firmware) packages (such as DD-WRT) that can be added to most routers that don't use the WPS approach in such an insecure manner.   Or, you could simply disable WPS in the router when not needed, and stay safe that way.