6 Replies Latest reply: Oct 16, 2011 9:14 PM by TG2 RSS

    Really long distance killing speed?

    dudeambiguously

      I have serious issues watching my slingbox based in the US at remote locations in SE Asia.  Currently my upload speed in the US is 40mps+ and my download speed in Malaysia is at least 10mps while attempting to watch it via web format.  I have been getting an average streaming video speed of about 100kps which makes viewing essentially impossible.  I did check with speedtest.net from my destination to a comcast server in the US and had a huge drop in speed compared to local servers, similar to what I am streaming slingbox at. Is there anything that can be done to resolve this issue?

        • Re: Really long distance killing speed?
          chakkarinen Apprentice

          I suspect that the download speeds in SE Asia are being throttled by the local ISP there, or by how the signal is being routed from the USA to there.   You might check with your ISP in SE Asia to see if there is anything that they can do for you -- for example, if you are watching from the same location all of the time, perhaps you can purchase a service contract with a higher speed limit?

            • Re: Really long distance killing speed?
              dudeambiguously

              Thanks for the reply, but I am actively checking speedtest.net among others to verify my download speed here in Asia and it is consistently above 10mps.  I can also watch other streaming video via youtube etc with no issues at a high speed.  I can up my internet here from 10mps to 20mps but if I am getting the slingbox at a fraction (100kps) of my current speed I can't see what upping my current internet here in Asis will do.  Although regular testing to US servers drops my speed drastically as opposed to local Asian servers, which leads me to believe its a distance issue.

                • Re: Really long distance killing speed?
                  callanish Apprentice

                  I'd say distance is an issue, but not to that extreme. I'm disappointed with only getting 1.3mbp's out of a 5mb upload connection 5000 miles away due to latency which also sees a drastic reduction in speed going through U.S servers, but I've just accepted that and as long as the quality and speed are consistent, I'm not complaining...............but getting 100kbps is downright awful with the bandwidth speeds you have to work with. Even if you are a lot farther away from your slingbox than I am, you still should be receiving a much higher speed stream than what you are getting. Solving a problem while you are so far away from your slingbox can be frustrating ( I know, I've been there), so you might have to call sling to see if they can troubleshoot possible issues on where the bottleneck might be.

              • Re: Really long distance killing speed?
                TG2 Newbie

                Its not the distance thats the problem but the interconnection of networks and subsequent bandwidth that is in use/available.

                 

                You can do a traceroute (dos cmd prompt:  tracert ) to your home ip address and to the sling servers to see what hops you go through.  Generally if you get a sudden jump in response time, you are either looking at a long distance hop, or a latent one.

                 

                Example ... going from DC to Washington state ... you would expect a ping / travel time of 50 to 80 milliseconds.  If one day I'm seeing 120 milliseconds ... then I know something has gone wrong .. and I perform a Tracert (trace route) to the destination and look at the results.

                 

                if I see any one hop thats adding 40 to 60 ms more than normal, I'll know that something has changed, and then ask my ISP if they can contact their uplink providers, their aggregate peering points, if the path taken can be adjusted.  Most of the time its temporary and will clear or revert to better paths on its own or after some engineer has decided that path-X is slowing things too much and they tweak the prefrence to path-Y ... usually these types of things are a few days max.. or if incidental/accidental a few hours..

                 

                The only thing you can really do is complain to your ISP that before last week, your connection to your home device was XX ... now its the pits.  Ask them to look and see if there is a problem..

                 

                Another option... is to relay your connection through someone else ... one way to do so, would be via VPN .. if your slingbox is on the east coast of the US, and you have a friend on he West coast ... you could see what your speed is like to your friends.. and if fast.. setup a VPN to their location, and then go from their location to your home slingbox.

                 

                There are also hosting providers out there specifically for this type of connection and they offer VPN service to help with this slow intermediate connection.  The reason why they could be faster is because they control their own peering sessions ... they may directly interconnect with your ISP on one side... and then with your home ISP on the other side.. and they then enable your session to come through them for a direct fee (again you usually have to VPN to them or go through their web interfaces because these intermediaries can't just grab *your* traffic, your traffic has to come to them)

                  • Re: Really long distance killing speed?
                    dudeambiguously

                    TG2, that seems like the right issue, my ping in Asia on local server is around 18-20ms, when I ping a server over in the US it jumps to 350ms+ so I will contact my ISP and work on that....wish me luck as the only other time I called they didn't even know what a dns setting was on the tech support at first attempt.  It is definitely not on the US side, someone tested from the slingbox location to a server local to me and had excellent performance ping @ 45ms and 20mps up and down on speed.

                    Thanks!

                      • Re: Really long distance killing speed?
                        TG2 Newbie

                        What you might do, is see what the paths are like using tracert

                         

                        Start -> run -> cmd  <enter>

                         

                        tracert "your.home.ip.address"    (without quotes)

                         

                        I've created a document and invited you to paste the traces should you want to.  I would say put them publically but sometimes its not wise to invite others to see end points.

                         

                        In any case ... the point would be to trace from both locations to the other. to see how the path goes.

                         

                        Add into the traces .. the trace from home to that server near you ... so that it can be seen what the path is to servers near you that aren't on your ISP's backbone.

                         

                        Hopefully with that, something can be pinpointed that might help when you contact your ISP.