3 Replies Latest reply: Sep 21, 2011 9:58 PM by chakkarinen RSS

    I just don't get it... how this thing works?

    PanzerIV

      The introduction video to the Slingbox is just completely pathetic and doesn't explain anything at all. Here's some questions I would have for example:

       

      - Why do I need to connect my hometheater "speakers" on it if it's being played remotely on other speakers?

      - If I plug it at home, can my friend on her tv or laptop at 17Km from me be able to remotely connect on my Slingbox and watch tv from my satelite?

      - If we happen to watch tv at the same time, what happens exactly?

      - Streaming in HD should consumme how much Mb per Houre for people who have a monthly limit or just want to know by curiosity.

       

      Thanks in advance.

        • Re: I just don't get it... how this thing works?
          chakkarinen Apprentice

          First, let me say that I have never watched the Introduction Video, so take everything I say with some grain of salt.

           

          - Why do I need to connect my hometheater "speakers" on it if it's being played remotely on other speakers?

           

          The Slingbox sends video and audio from an input stream over the Internet.   If you are connecting the homespeaker audio outputs to your Slingbox for streaming over the internet, then your hometheater speakers won't be getting any sound for you to listen locally unless you connect them to the "downstream passthrough" side of the Slingbox inputs?   Not real sure myself about this answer, since I only stream standard TV signals, with their "straightforward" audio and video wires.

           

          -  If I plug it at home, can my friend on her tv or laptop at 17Km from me  be able to remotely connect on my Slingbox and watch tv from my  satelite?

           

          if you connect the audio/video wires that currently run from your satellite to your TV to the input side of your Slingbox, then whatever the satellite has been sending to your TV will be streamed out over the Internet, and your friend can watch it on her laptop anywhere in Internet land.  She could watch the video on her TV IF she had a VGA cable that can connect her laptop to her TV.   Some newer TVs have this capabilty, which in effect make the TV a big external monitor for the laptop.   However, the audio will still come out from the tiny laptop speakers and not the big TV speakers.

           

          The real trick to making this an effective way for your friend to watch your TV will be whether the Slingbox options for setting up a virtual remote control on her laptop will include a model that mimics your real remote control for your satellite.   AND, you would need to connect an IR Blaster cable to your Slingbox that would sit in front of the IR window on your satellite box, so that when your friend presses a button on the virtual remote on her laptop screen, the signal would be sent through, the internet, then thru the slingbox, then through the IR blaster cable to your satellite.   In practice, this takes a little time, so the response is about a half-second slower than when you change channels with your real remote sitting in front of your satellite.

           

           

          - If we happen to watch tv at the same time, what happens exactly?

           

          If either of you changes channels, the TV will respond accordingly. The two of you will not be able to watch two separate channels on the satellite at the same time -- unless your satellite has options for sending separate channels (with two remotes?) to separate connected devices.  I understand that some TV services now offer the capability to record up to 4 separate programs at the same time, so they must have 4 separate channel tuners built in to their systems.

           

          - Streaming in HD should consumme how much Mb per Houre for people who have a monthly limit or just want to know by curiosity.

           

          When I stream Standard Definition, it is about 750 megabytes per hour.   I rarely attempt to stream HD, which I would guess is about 10 times as much data per hour.   And, unless you have a very, VERY fast upload speed on the Internet service where your Slingbox is physically located -- say, at least 10 MBPS? -- you will likely find that the video stutters or stalls altogether when you attempt to stream HD over the more common slower upload speed ISPs.

           

           

          - Thanks in advance.

           

          You are welcome

            • Re: I just don't get it... how this thing works?
              PanzerIV

              Thanks a lot of ur answer it was very interesting to get your opinion. So basicly it's just a huge pain in the *** for not much in the end. This whole idea of streaming the tv "all over the world" totaly fails when you remember that 90% of the ISP are cheap f*ckers who put 800Kbit upload on purpose even if they would be able to give us more. They want us to slow down other ISP but not themselve. I don't see how anybody is gonna stream in HD and who's gonna buy in North America the 300$ version of the Slingbox to steam in HD if all Internet companie here give you at most 1Mbit of upload, it's just not gonna work at all so it's all pointless. I knew it was too nice to be true, sadly.

                • Re: I just don't get it... how this thing works?
                  chakkarinen Apprentice

                  HD is the problem, as it requires an order of magnitude more data.   I have Tivos, and they work great with Standard Definition programs.   Still, those SD programs require 750 megabytes per hour of broadcast time to save a program on a hard disk.   So, for me to stream those same standard definition TV programs requires sending through my Slingboxes about 750 megabytes per hour -- and probably a bit more to account for "overhead".   750 megabytes per hour is 6,000 megaBITS per hour, or about 1.7 megabits per second.  My home internet service provider currently provides me with 4 mbps UPLOAD speeds, which is more than adequate to sling my standard definition TV, but no way adequate to sling HD TV.

                   

                  If and when my ISP upgrades all of their residential lines to fiber optic cable, then, sure, streaming HD TV would be no problem for me.

                   

                  And since my spouse is now quite happy with being able to watch all of our Tivo-saved programs on her laptop from virtually anywhere in Internet Land at Standard Definition, that makes me a Happy Camper too.  And frankly, I chose the Slingbox Pro HD over the standard Slingbox for its 4 connection possibilities (compared to 1 on the standard Slingbox), rather than for its HD capabilities.